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Poisons in Our Foods and Environment

Parabens


Parabens are a group of chemicals commonly used as preservatives to prevent the growth of bacteria and fungi that are widely used in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries and typically found in a wide range of products including shampoos, commercial moisturizers, deodorants, shaving gels, cleansing gels, personal lubricants, spray tanning solutions and toothpaste, and they are a commonly used as food additives (E 214-219) and they are also used in topical and parenteral pharmaceuticals.

While parabens are effective preservatives with a low cost and long history of relatively safe use they are becoming increasingly controversial and as the evidence accumulates and arguments between the paraben supporters and the safety conscious opponents grows, perhaps this is a chemical group we can learn to do without, as if it has some mild toxic effect, it will be contributing to the general toxic overload so many suffer from today.

European Research Report
The former EC Scientific Committee for Food (SCF) evaluated the parabens in 1994 and allocated a temporary group ADI (Acceptable Daily Intake) of 0-10 mg/kg bw (milligrams/kilogram body weight), for the sum of methyl, ethyl and propyl p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters and their sodium salts. Following a request from the European Commission (EC), EFSA’s AFC Panel re-evaluated the toxicology of these substances and the safety of their usage in foods taking into account findings from recent studies. The panel concluded that a group ADI of 0-10 mg/kg bw could now be established for methyl and ethyl parabens and their sodium salts. However, the panel considered that propyl paraben should not be included in this group ADI because this specific paraben, unlike the methyl and ethyl forms, had effects on sperm production at a relatively low dose in male juvenile rats. The Panel was unable to recommend an ADI for propyl paraben because of the lack of a clear NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) for this effect. Read the complete article.

Science Direct Report
Acute toxicity studies in animals indicate that methyl paraben is practically non-toxic by both oral and parenteral routes. In a population with normal skin, methyl paraben is practically non-irritating and non-sensitizing. (Science Direct)

We think that for human use, practically non toxic is not good enough!!




 

Poisons Index
Aluminium
Asbestos
Common Toxins
Estrogens
Fluoride
 
A mind control drug  
Milk
 A1 & 2 Milk
 Milk and Ostorporosis
Genetically Engineered Foods
 
GE Corn in NZ
  GMO Corn Failure

Mercury
Parabens
Plastics
Radiation
Sweeteners
  Aspartame
  Nectresse
  Saccharin
  Splenda
  Sugar- a sweet poison
  Sodium Laurel Sulphate
Trans Fatty Acids

 
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