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Poisons > Nectresse

An modified sugar combination

McNeil Nutritionals, LLC, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, and maker of the artificial sweetener Splenda, produces what it refers to as a “natural” sweetener known as Nectresse to cater specifically to those looking for a healthy alternative to artificial sweeteners and sugar even though no such thing exists.

All refined sugars, even fruit juices contain so much sugar they are hazardous to health.

So is Nectresse really as natural as McNeil claims it is, or is the product just another example of tricky marketing hype aimed at health-conscious consumers?

Nectresse ingredients:

Erythritol (a sugar alcohol)
Sugar
Molasses
Mogroside V (aka Mogroside 5) which is an extract of monkfruit

According to the Nectresse website, the product is “100 percent natural,” and is made from the heat-stable extract of an Asian melon known as monk fruit, or Lo Han as supplied by a New Zealand based manufacturer. McNeil claims that Nectresse contains zero calories per serving, and that monk fruit is 150 times sweeter than sugar, which means that consumers do not need to use very much of it to effectively sweeten foods and beverages.

But monk fruit is not the only ingredient in Nectresse, nor is it even the primary ingredient

The first and most abundant ingredient in Nectresse is actually erythritol, a sugar alcohol commonly derived from corn, the vast majority of which has been genetically modified (GM) in the U.S. and therefore potentially harmful

The second ingredient in Nectresse is sugar, which is refined and more than likely comes from GM sugar beet.

The third ingredient in Nectresse is molasses. This is another form of sugar is more than likely derived from GM sugar beets — producers that use sugar from sugar cane, after all, typically indicate this on their ingredient labels.

The fourth and smallest ingredient in Nectresse by volume is monk fruit, which is extracted using a natural process involving both water and heat rather than chemicals — this is good and you can see the process in this video.

According to MonkFruit.org, monk fruit can actually be up to 200 times sweeter than sugar because it contains natural antioxidants known as mogrosides that have a strong, sweet taste, but that are not actually considered to be sugar. These mogrosides are unique to monk fruit, and they also contain zero calories.

By itself, in other words, monk fruit appears to be viable as a healthy, alternative sweetener that, because of its heat stability, can work better than stevia in certain food applications that require baking, sauteing, or other forms of heat cooking.

In summary

So three out of the four ingredients used in Nectresse appear to be derived from bioengineered crops, and two of these ingredients are refined sugars. Since erythritol is a sugar alcohol, as well as the most abundant ingredient in Nectresse, how can McNeil legally claim under U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines that Nectresse contains zero calories per serving?

But the fact that Nectresse more than likely contains ingredients derived from GM sources means that it is hardly the “natural” product that McNeil is hyping it up to be. Sure, Nectresse contains a little bit of monk fruit which like the stevia plant, contains compounds that are naturally very sweet, but that do not provide the body with calories in the same way as sugar. But the other ingredients found in Nectresse can hardly be considered natural.

Nectresse appears to use monk fruit to simply sell sugar which represents the corporate food industry’s latest attempt at trying to cash in on the health-conscious.  It does not matter that the label say zero calories, any sugar when metabolised stores sugars as fat and this is not a solution for weight loss.

References
http://www.naturalnews.com/036719_Splenda_Nectresse_ingredients.html
http://www.draxe.com/is-nectresse-safe-the-new-natural-sweetener-by-splenda/
http://diagnosisdiet.com/what-is-nectresse/
Biovittoria the Hamilton based producer of Mogroside
Genetically modified




 

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  Nectresse
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