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Ayurveda > NCCAM

By Dr. Satish Kulkarni

The United States has no national standard for certifying or training Ayurvedic practitioners, although a few states have approved Ayurvedic schools. Some Ayurvedic professional organizations are collaborating to develop licensing requirements.

Is NCCAM supporting any studies on Ayurveda?

Yes, NCCAM supports studies in this area. For example:

  • Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine tested the effects of guggul lipid on high cholesterol. Over the 6-month period of this study, they did not find that adults with high cholesterol showed any improvement in cholesterol levels. In fact, the levels of low-density lipoproteins (the "bad" cholesterol) increased slightly in some people in the group taking guggul. In addition, some in the guggul lipid group developed a skin rash. This team is conducting further studies on herbal therapies used in Ayurveda for cardiovascular conditions, including curcuminoids (substances found in the root of the plant turmeric).
  • At the NCCAM-supported Center for Phytomedicine Research at the University of Arizona, scientists are investigating three botanicals (ginger, turmeric, and boswellia) used in Ayurvedic medicine to treat inflammatory disorders. They are seeking to better understand these botanicals and determine whether they might be useful in treating arthritis and asthma.
  • A compound from a plant called Mucuna pruriens, also known as cowhage, is being studied at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. The research team is investigating the compound's potential to prevent or lessen the severe, often disabling side effects that people with Parkinson's disease experience from prolonged treatment with conventional drugs.




 

Index
Introduction
Medicines
Ayurvedic Milestones
Ayurvedic Thought
 Vaat, Pitta, Kafa, Dosh
 Dhatu, Mala, Fire
Pathology - Ama
Treatments
 Shaman
 Ashtang Ayurved
 Agad Tantra
 Bhut-vidya
 Kayachikitsa
 Kaumar Bhrutya Tantra
 Purva-karma
 Panch-karma
 Vaman
 Virechan
 Basti
 Nasya
 Rakta-moksha
 Shaman
 Shalya Tantra
 Shalakya tantra
 Rasayana-Chikitsa
 Vajikaran-Chikitsa

Actual Case Notes
 Asthmatic Bronchitis
 Bleeding per anum
 Constipation
 Diarrhea
 Hair Loss
 Infections
 Libido
 Osteoarthritis
 Psychiatry
 Pregnancy Care
 Senile Debility
 Solution To Baldness
 Vaat Related Fever

Academic References
Ayurvedic Herbs
NCCAM

 
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